Impossible Foods, maker of plant-based meat and dairy products, has brought their famous healthy burger from their kitchen to Singapore’s Japanese burger chain, MOS Burger. 

From December 9, you can order the Impossible Burger from any of the 39 MOS Burger and MOS Cafe outlets across Singapore for only $6.95 (a la carte). 

The Impossible Burger is packed with the Impossible plant-based patty, sliced cheese, fried onions and a BBQ glaze sandwiched between two buns. The Impossible patty has been widely lauded to be the plant-based burger which most resembles real meat in terms of texture, taste and juiciness.

MOS Burgers are prepared fresh so expect to enjoy the Impossible Burger in its fullest flavour as it reaches your table. For a complete meal, get your plant-based burger fix along with MOS’ famous side treats like the classic french fries, MOS Chicken, croquettes or green salad, corn or mushroom soup, and desserts including Hokkaido milk ice cream, spiral ice soft serve, and iced milk tea.

The Impossible Foods has been serving the Impossible Burger to Singaporean restaurant-goers and top chefs for eight months now through partnerships with food and beverage establishments such as Bread Street Kitchen by Gordan Ramsay, P.S. Café at Raffles City, CUT by Wolfgang Pack, and Wolf Burger. In April this year, Burger King made headlines for becoming the first global fast food burger chain to offer the Impossible Burger in 180 outlets in the United States. Its meatless Whopper became available across 7,000 locations across the US in August.

“After seeing the amazing response to the Impossible Burger all across Singapore, we were eager to put our chefs to work creating the Impossible MOS Burger,” said Mr Kazuya Inukai- CEO of MOS Foods Singapore.

MOS burger has 1,294 outlets in Japan and is also famous for their Rice Burger which replaces traditional buns with circular grilled rice cakes flavoured with Japanese seasonings. 

The Impossible burger is available at MOS for a limited time offer, while stocks last.  





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